Emily Abendroth

Emily Abendroth
Emily Abendroth (B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., Temple University) is a teacher, writer, and human rights activist residing in Philadelphia. She regularly teaches literature, the contemporary essay, 20th-century poetics, and creative writing to undergraduates and students of all ages. Much of her creative work attempts to investigate state regimes of force and power, as well as individual and collective resistance strategies. Her poetry is often published in limited edition, handcrafted chapbooks by small and micropresses such as Albion Press, Belladonna, Horse Less Press, Little Red Leaves, and Zumbar. She has been awarded residencies at the MacDowell Colony, the Millay Colony, and the Headlands Center for the Arts. In 2012, she was named a Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellow and in 2013, a Pew Fellow in Poetry. She is the author of the poetry collection ]Exclosures[ (Ahsahta Press, 2014) and The Instead, a book-length collaborative conversation with fiction writer Miranda Mellis (Carville Annex Press, 2016). She is the co-founder of Address This!, a grassroots educational project that offers social-justice focused correspondence courses to individuals incarcerated throughout the state of Pennsylvania. 

Denis Akhapkin

Denis Akhapkin
Denis Akhapkin currently teaches in the Liberal Arts and Humanities program at Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia, where also works as a head of Centre for Writing and Critical Thinking. His interests include modern Russian literature with an emphasis on poetry and poetics, literary linguistics and cognitive literature studies. He published a book of commentaries to poetry of Russian-American Nobel prize author Joseph Brodsky («Joseph Brodsky: After Russia», 2009, in Russian). His work has appeared in Toronto Slavic Quarterly, Russian Literature and other journals, he is also the author of several biographies of Russian writers in Dictionary of Literary Biography (DLB).  He was a visiting research fellow of Helsinki University Collegium (spring 2007) and The Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, University of Edinburgh (fall 2014). He holds both B.A. and PhD in Russian Language from Saint-Petersburg State University. Denis lives at Saint-Petersburg, Russia.
 

Dorothy Albertini

Dorothy Albertini
Dorothy Albertini teaches for Bard’s Learning Commons and works as an assistant Dean of Studies in the Center for Student Life & Advising at Bard. She has been a fellow at the MacDowell Arts Colony, Ucross Foundation, and the Blue Mountain Center. Her work appears in Fence, Aufgabe, Drunken Boat, The Brooklyn Rail, and NANO Fiction, where she was the winner of the first annual NANO fiction contest. For many years, she was the Associate for College Preparatory & Volunteer Programs and Green Haven Campus Coordinator at the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI). During her time with BPI, Albertini developed and taught a college preparatory writing and reading course, utilizing Institute practices as the foundation for addressing students’ transitions from varied educational backgrounds. She received her B.A. from Bard College and MFA from Bard’s Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts.

Jaime Alves

Jaime Alves
(B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park.) Jaime's specialization is in 19th-century American literature and culture; areas of interest include literary representations of schoolgirls and female education; domesticity and gender studies; science, medicine and disability studies; newspapers/periodicals and archival research; museums as purveyors of knowledge and sites of informal learning. Jaime taught literature and writing at UMCP, and coordinated writing programs at UMCP and the University of Baltimore; as Program Coordinator at the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies, and in collaboration with the Maryland State Department of Education, Jaime designed interdisciplinary professional development institutes for Maryland's public middle- and high school teachers. Since coming to Bard in 2007, Jaime has taught literature courses for the Bard MAT and Bard's undergraduate college. Among other publications, Jaime's scholarship has been featured in *Legacy* and *American Culture, Canons, and the Case of Elizabeth Stoddard*; she is the author of *Fictions of Female Education in the Nineteenth Century* (Routledge 2009; paperback 2013).

Glynis Benbow-Niemier

Glynis Benbow-Niemier
Glynis Benbow-Niemier lives and writes in Illinois; she has most recently taught composition at College of DuPage, where she is also working to complete a certificate in online education. She joined the Institute for Writing and Thinking in 1988, leading Language & Thinking workshops for Bard’s first year students for several years; she continues to lead IWT workshops for teachers and has lead consulting workshops in Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, and Iowa. She is currently working again with the summer writing workshops for high school students through the IWT Network. (PhD, New York University; MA, University of Colorado, BA, Indiana University.)

Jeff Berger-White

Jeff Berger-White
Jeff Berger-White teaches English at Deerfield High School, where he has been teaching his entire career. During his twenty-seven years there, he has taught all grades and all levels. He currently teaches Sophomore English, A.P. Literature and Composition, and Sophomore English Survey, a course designed for struggling readers and writers. In 2007, Jeff was selected as one of Golden Apple’s Teachers of Distinction, and this spring, Jeff won the Distinguished Secondary Teaching Award (DSTA) from Northwestern University. Jeff has been involved with the Institute for Writing and Thinking since 1996, when he began working with Lake Forest College’s Writing and Thinking Workshop, one of the Institute’s summer programs for high school students. In addition to teaching for many summers at Lake Forest College, Jeff has taught in the Monte Sol Writing Workshop at St. John’s College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and in Bard’s Language and Thinking Workshop. He holds a B.A. and an M.A.T., both from Boston University.

Ian Bickford

Ian Bickford
Ian Bickford is Provost and Vice President of Bard College at Simon’s Rock. In recent articles in Milton Studies (“A High Shelf: Milton and Seventh-day Adventism,” 2010, and “(Survival of the) Fit(test), Though Few: Darwin’s Miltonic America,” forthcoming 2017) and Modern Philology (“‘Dead Might Not Be Dead’: Milton in the Americas and Jamaica Kincaid’s Flat World,” 2014), Bickford charts the often subterranean channels of John Milton’s influence in the Americas. His areas of research and teaching also include Early Modern race and gender, 19th-century American literature and religion, and film. Bickford holds an AA from Bard College at Simon's Rock, BA from U.C. Berkeley, MA from Stanford University, and PhD from the CUNY Graduate Center.

Celia Bland

Celia Bland
Celia Bland, IWT Associate Director, leads IWT workshops nationally and internationally.  She is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently, Cherokee Road Kill, illustrated by Kyoko Miyabe (2018).  She is co-editor of a collection of critical essays about the poetry of Jane Cooper, A Radiance of Attention (U. of Michigan 2019).  Her essay on teaching poetry, "Dialogic Poetry," appeared in Reflecting Pool: Poets on the Creative Process (SUNY 2018).

Curt Nehring Bliss

Curt Nehring Bliss
Curt Nehring Bliss is a Professor of English at Finger Lakes Community College in Canandaigua, New York. After serving many years as the College's Honors Program Director and Center for Teaching and Learning Faculty Coordinator, Curt has shifted his focus to supporting students' transition from high school to college. In this capacity, he currently oversees the College's AA Liberal Arts & Sciences degree and provides leadership on various First Year Experience initiatives. An educator for 26 years committed to the mission of open-admissions 2-year colleges, he has received recognition at the state level with a SUNY Chancellor's Award for Faculty Service and an Illinois Community College Trustees Association's Award for Outstanding Teaching. A longtime participant and Faculty Associate for the past 6 years, Curt has regularly facilitated IWT's week-long "Teaching the Academic Paper" workshop. Inspired by his work with IWT, he created the FLCC Honors House—a "laboratory for the teaching and learning arts," which features seminar-based classrooms in a home-like setting designed to promote active and reflective learning. Curt also writes and performs with Dead Metaphor Cabaret—an artist ensemble interested in exploring the fertile edges along which poetry and music graze.

Julia Bloch

Julia Bloch
Julia Bloch holds a BA in political philosophy from Carleton College, an MFA in poetry from Mills College, and a PhD in English from the University of Pennsylvania. For two years, she taught literature and teaching methods at the Bard Master of Arts in Teaching program in Delano, California. She now directs the Creative Writing Program at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, where she teaches literature and creative writing. A Pew Fellow in the Arts, she is the author of three books of poetry, Letters to Kelly Clarkson (a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award), Valley Fever, and The Sacramento of Desire, and has published essays and book reviews in Journal of Modern LiteratureTulsa Studies in Women’s LiteratureTripwire, and elsewhere. She is writing a critical book about lyric and the 20th-century long poem and is an editor at Jacket2.

Maureen Burgess

Maureen Burgess
Maureen Burgess currently is the K-12 Dean of Teaching and Learning and the Head of Middle School at The Hewitt School, an independent girls school on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. She received her Ph.D. in English from The Ohio State University in 2000 before beginning a career in independent school education. In 2011, she founded the Center for Teaching and Learning through Writing (CTLW) at Hewitt, which focuses on writing to learn across the curriculum. A middle, upper, and post-secondary instructor for over twenty-five years, Maureen's current areas of focus are writing as thinking as a mode of mindfulness practice in the classroom, adolescent girls as writers and storytellers in the digital age, formative assessment models, innovative and strategic educational planning, and coaching/self-renewal practices for faculty in K-16 schools. Beginning July 1, 2019, Maureen will serve as the Assistant Head of School for Learning and Innovation at Hewitt.  

Rachel Cavell

Rachel Cavell
Rachel Cavell teaches in Bard’s Language and Thinking Program, and is a Faculty Associate with Bard’s Institute for Writing and Thinking, regularly leading professional development workshops. She also teaches courses in American civics and the American manifesto in the Bard Prison Initiative; and she will be teaching a writing intensive course in essay and revision to Bard undergraduates this Fall. She has taught in the Bard Masters in Teaching Program and with Bard’s English Language Summer Institute, working on English Language reading and writing fluency with students from Smolny College, St. Petersburg, Russia. Rachel is also a writer and an attorney, representing children in disputes before the family court. She recently obtained a certificate in Restorative Justice with Planning Change, in NYC.

Rebecca Chace

Rebecca Chace
Rebecca Chace is the author of: Leaving Rock Harbor (novel, Scribner 2010); Capture the Flag (novel, Simon and Schuster, 1999); Chautauqua Summer (memoir, Harourt, 1993). A book for middle readers, June Sparrow and The Million Dollar Penny (Harper-Collins 2017). Plays: Colette; The Awakening (adaptation of novel by Kate Chopin). Screenplays/Teleplays: award winning adaptation of her novel, Capture the Flag, with director, Lisanne Skyler. Chace has written for the New York Times Magazine, New York Times Sunday Book Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Huffington Post, NPR’s All Things Considered and many other publications. She was a 2016 Writing Fellow at Dora Maar House (Menerbes, France); 2015-2016 member of the Wertheim Study at the New York Public Library; 2014 recipient of the Grace Paley Fiction Fellowship, Vermont Studio Center; The Frances Shaw Fellowship at the Ragdale Foundation; a MacDowell Colony Fellow and Yaddo Foundation fellow. She is Director of the MA in Creative Writing and Literature, and Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Deirdre d'Albertis

Deirdre d'Albertis
Deirdre d'Albertis 
B.A., Barnard College; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. Author, Dissembling Fictions: Elizabeth Gaskell and the Victorian Social Text and volume editor, Elizabeth Gaskelli's Ruth.  Current projects include Femina Faber: Victorian Women, Writing Work and the Work of Writing along with a study of transnational feminist networks in England, Europe, and the United States focused through the relationship of Swedish novelist Fredrika Bremer and her English translator Mary Howitt.  Essays on George Eliot, Charlotte and Emily Bronte, Margaret Oliphant, and Mary Howitt as well as reviews have appeared in Nineteenth-Century Contexts;  Victorian Studies; Studies in English Literature; Victorians Institute Journal; Journal of the History of Sexuality; and Review. Grants and awards: National Endowment for the Humanities summer stipend and American Association of University Women American Fellowship. Areas of interest: Victorian literature and culture, gender and sexuality studies, history of the novel, environmental approaches to literature and post-apocalyptic narrative; women and leadership, public education and the study of literature.

Alan Devenish

Alan Devenish
Alan Devenish recently joined the faculty of the Bard Prison Initiative and has previously taught literature and human rights for the college program at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. A faculty member of the original Language & Thinking Program and Associate of the Institute for Writing and Thinking, he has led numerous workshops for students and teachers at Bard and at sites nationwide and was the founding director of  the Writing and Thinking Workshop for high school students at Lake Forest College. Formerly Professor of English at Westchester Community College, he co-directed the Poets & Writers Series and Human Rights Union, and received SUNY Chancellor’s Awards in Teaching, Scholarship and Creative Activity. His poetry has appeared in various magazines and anthologies. He has a B.A. from Marist College, an M.A. in French Literature and a Ph.D. in English Education from New York University. 

Anna Dolan

Anna Dolan
Anna Dolan (M.F.A., playwriting, Yale University; M.F.A., directing, University of Massachusetts, Amherst) teaches Playwriting in the Creative Writing Program and the English Department at Central Connecticut State University. She also teaches in the Young Writers' Workshop at Fir Acres and Bard College at Simon's Rock. She is a playwright and has written (and had produced) over 30 plays. She has recently written a recitation/adaptation of Jim Thompson's *The Killer Inside Me* for Maloney Theater in New Britain Connecticut, and an adaptation of *Men in the Sun* for the Freedom Theater of Jenin in Palestine. She received a grant from the Secretariat of the Pacific Community to write and direct two plays for the Sokhes Theater of Pohnpei in Micronesia-FSM, where she taught at the College of Micronesia-FSM for two years.

Stephanie Dunson

Stephanie Dunson
Stephanie Dunson has been Director of Writing Programs at Williams College since the inception of the office in 2010. In this capacity, she advises faculty from across disciplines on all things writing-related and introduces them to writing practices that best serve a rigorous liberal arts curriculum. In addition to filling the traditional role of program director, she has asserted the key initiative of supporting faculty as writers, working individually with them to develop writing routines that are productive and sustainable. She holds a PhD in English and American Studies from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst, Massachusetts) and was formerly professor of English and African American Culture at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, Rhode Island). In her twenty-five-year career as a writing specialist and scholar, Dr. Dunson has held positions as Director of the Writing Center at Mount Holyoke College (South Hadley, Massachusetts), Coordinator of Tutorial Services at Smith College (Northampton, Massachusetts), and Lecturer for the Graduate Liberal Studies Program at Wesleyan University (Middletown, Connecticut). As a long-standing faculty consultant for the Institute for Writing and Thinking at Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, New York), she has served as a writing consultant for schools and universities across the United States.

Jennifer Eyl

Jennifer Eyl
Jennifer Eyl (B.A., University of Georgia; Post-Bac/M.A., San Francisco State University; M.A. and Ph.D., Brown University) is an Assistant Professor of Religion at Tufts University. She works on ancient Christianity and ancient Mediterranean religions. She is finishing her first book, which contextualizes the apostle Paul in the wider world of itinerant divinatory specialists of the early Roman Empire. Her other areas of interest include gender in antiquity, theory of religion, translation theory, and cognitive science. She has presented several papers at conferences in the US, Lisbon, and Rome, and has published articles on the Acts of Paul and Thekla, and translation theory in New Testament studies.

Natalia Fedorova

Natalia Fedorova
Natalia Fedorova is a language artist, science art researcher and a 101. Media art festival curator. Natalia holds a PhD in literary theory from Herzen State University (St-Petersburg). Natalia won a Fulbright scholarship to do her first year postdoctorate term at the Trope Tank at MIT, where she was working on translating e-lit, and SPIRE to develop Russian Electronic Literature Collection in a specialized knowledge base at the University of Bergen for her second year term. She is currently teaching creative writing with new media and text-based art in Smolny College (St-Petersburg State University – Bard College). As an artist she is working on interspecies communicator for the New anthropology project at Pavlov institute in Koltushy (Saint-Petersburg).

Derek Furr

Derek Furr
Derek Furr teaches literature at the Master of Arts in Teaching Program at Bard College. B.A., Wake Forest University; M.Ed., University of Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. Areas of interest: Romantic and modern poetics, reception study, reading assessment and instruction. Author of Recorded Poetry and Poetic Reception from Edna Millay to the Circle of Robert Lowell (Palgrave 2010). Recent contributions to The Journal of Modern Literature, Twentieth Century Literature, Romantic Textualities and Approaches to Teaching Poe’s Prose and Poetry. Awards: Dupont Fellow (University of Virginia), Andrew W. Mellon Fellow. Teaching and research experience: Middle school teacher/reading specialist, Charlottesville City Schools; teacher educator for TEMPO Graduate Education Program, and research assistant for Center for Improvement of Early Reading Achievement, and English writing instructor, University of Virginia.

Madeleine George

Madeleine George
Madeleine George's plays include *The (curious case of the) Watson Intelligence* (Pulitzer Prize finalist; Outer Critics Circle John Gassner Award), *Seven Homeless Mammoths Wander New England* (Susan Smith Blackburn finalist), *Precious Little*, and *The Zero Hour* (Jane Chambers Award, Lambda Literary Award finalist). They've made their way to the stage through workshops at Berkeley Rep, Soho Rep, New York Theatre Workshop, Manhattan Theatre Club, and the O'Neill Playwrights Conference, and have been produced by Playwrights Horizons, Clubbed Thumb, Shotgun Players in Berkeley, City Theatre in Pittsburgh, Theater Wit in Chicago, Perseverance Theatre in Alaska, and Two River Theater Company in New Jersey, among many other places. Madeleine is a resident playwright at New Dramatists and was a founding member of the Obie-Award-winning playwrights' collective 13P (Thirteen Playwrights, Inc.). She was on the faculty of the Bard Language and Thinking Program in the early 2000s, and for seven years served as director of the Bard College satellite campus at Bayview Correctional Facility in Manhattan.

Zhenya Glazanova

Zhenya Glazanova
Zhenya Glazanova works as an associate professor at Smolny College, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Science, Saint Petersburg State University, Russia, where she works at the Centre for Writing and Critical Thinking and is the director of tutoring program. She teaches Language and Thinking, First Year Seminar and Academic Writing. Her interests include psycholinguistics, psychology, cognitive science and pedagogy. She holds and M.A. in mathematical, structural and applied linguistics and PhD in Psycholinguistics, as well she has a diploma in psychotherapy. Her hobby is making ceramics. Zhenya lives in Saint-Petersburg, Russia.
 

Darlene Gold

Darlene Gold
Darlene Gold is a Professor of English and Creative Writing at Tompkins Cortland Community College.  In May 2017, she received the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Her poetry has appeared in Mudfish, Pressed Wafer, The Hat and The Minnesota Review.  Her chapbook, Midnight Antelopes, was published by Pressed Wafer Press.  Her essay, “Pianoforte a Quatre Mains,” made the Prism International’s Creative Nonfiction Contest longlist. Her essay, “Wedding” appears in the International Anthology:  Under the Volcano: The Best Writing of Our First 15 Years, Morelos Mexico, 2018.  She holds a B.A. in English from Boston University, an M.F.A. in writing from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in English from Binghamton University.

Rebecca Granato

Rebecca Granato
Rebecca Granato is the Assistant Dean and Visiting Assistant Professor of History at al Quds Bard College in Abu Dis, where she has been since the program’s inception in 2009. She has been teaching in the Language & Thinking Program, the Institute’s program for incoming Bard freshmen, since 2004 and she currently oversees the L&T program at al Quds Bard. As an Institute Associate Rebecca has given workshops at several of Bard’s international partnership programs, including her home institution, al Quds Bard, Bard in Annandale, European Humanities University in Lithuania, and at the American University of Central Asia in Bishkek. Her own research focuses on the evolution of Palestinian nationalism inside Israeli prisons between 1967 and 1985. Rebecca is currently a Palestinian American Research Council fellow, and more recently the recipient of the Ontario Graduate Scholarship for dissertation completion.

Alfred E. Guy

Alfred E. Guy
Alfred E. Guy Jr. is R.W.B. Lewis Director of the Yale College Writing Center. He was formerly the director of the Expository Writing Program at Johns Hopkins University and associate director of the Princeton Writing Program. He taught in the English department and was associate director, Expository Writing Program at New York University from 1992-2001. His scholarship includes studies in composition and rhetoric, medieval English literature, and American science fiction. B.A., Harvard; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., New York University. Awards include the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Award for Teaching Excellence; Golden Dozen Award for Teaching Excellence.

Nick Hiebert

Nick Hiebert
Nick Hiebert teaches high school English at Concord Academy in Concord, Massachusetts. His areas of interest include the literature of social justice, contemporary fiction and memoir, environmental/food writing, and literature about technology and community.

Michelle Hoffman

Michelle Hoffman
Michelle Hoffman (B.Sc., Concordia University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto) is the Assistant Director of IWT and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bard College, where she teaches courses in history and philosophy of science and in the First-Year Seminar program. Michelle's area of focus at IWT is writing to learn in STEM disciplines. Previously, she has taught at the American University of Central Asia, Bard's partner in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, as well as in Bard's Language and Thinking Program and the Bard Prison Initiative. Her research focuses on the history of psychology and education. She has a particular interest in transfer of training, a body of experimental research that examines whether learning skills acquired in one area readily transfer to other domains—a question that strikes at the core of teachers’ work.

Jamie Hutchinson

Jamie Hutchinson
Jamie Hutchinson (AB, English, Stanford University; MA, English, University of Virginia; PhD, American Studies, University of New Mexico) is Professor Emeritus of English at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, where he continues to teach on an adjunct basis. He also directs the Bard College at Simon's Rock Summer Young Writers Workshop, in which he taught from 1983 to 2013. Previous teaching positions include Colorado State University, the University of New Mexico, Berkshire Community College, and SUNY Albany. He taught in the Language and Thinking program at Bard College (1984-1990) and led teacher workshops for the Institute for Writing & Thinking from 1984 until the early 2000s. His articles, personal essays, and reviews have appeared in ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance, The American Nature Writing Newsletter, The Berkshire Review, Under the Sun, Writing From the Inside Out, Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature and The Journal of Inklings Studies. He has also presented papers at the annual conventions of the Modern Language Association, the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association, the New England Modern Language Association, and the American Literature Association. 
 

Ileana Jiménez

Ileana Jiménez
For eighteen years, Ileana Jiménez has been a leader in the field of feminist and social justice education. In an effort to inspire teachers to bring women’s and gender studies to the K-12 classroom, she launched her blog, Feminist Teacher, in 2009; she is also the creator of the #HSfeminism and #K12feminism hashtags. Since then, Feminist Teacher has become recognized by educators nationally and globally. Based in New York, Ileana teaches innovative courses on feminism and activism that have gained the attention of education and activist circles. In 2010, she was named one of the 30 Women Making History by the Women’s Media Center; later that year, she was named one of the 40 Feminists Under 40 by the Feminist Press. She is also the 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Fulbright Award in Teaching, for which she traveled to Mexico City to create safe and inclusive schools for LGBT youth. In 2012, she appeared on the Melissa Harris-Perry Show to talk about teaching feminism to high school students and to advocate for safe schools. Sought after for her insight on education, she has written for Feministing, Gender Across Borders, the Huffington Post, Ms. Magazine, On the Issues, the Smith Alumnae Quarterly, and the Women’s Media Center. A frequently-asked speaker on feminism in schools, she travels nationally and globally to speak to educators in both secondary and higher education. She received her B.A. in English Literature at Smith College, and an M.A. in English Literature at Middlebury College.

Erica Kaufman

Erica Kaufman
Erica Kaufman (B.A., Douglass College, Rutgers University; M.F.A., The New School, Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center) is the Director of the Bard Institute for Writing and Thinking. She has taught in the English Department at Baruch College, worked with the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute, and served as a Curriculum Specialist for the Holocaust Educators Network. She has been a visiting writer and visiting professor at Naropa University and Parsons the New School for Design. Her publications include the full-length poetry collections INSTANT CLASSIC (Roof Books 2013) and censory impulse (Factory School 2009). Kaufman is the co-editor of Adrienne Rich: Teaching at CUNY, 1968-1974 (Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, 2014) and of NO GENDER: Reflections on the Life and Work of kari edwards (Venn Diagram, 2009). Prose and critical work can be found in: Jacket2, Open Space/SFMOMA and in The Color of Vowels: New York School Collaborations (ed. Mark Silverberg, Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Additional critical work is forthcoming in the MLA Guide to Teaching Gertrude Stein (eds. L. Esdale and D. Mix). Kaufman also co-coordinates the Teacher Resource Center for the Modern & Contemporary American Poetry MOOC in collaboration with the Kelly Writers House at the University of Pennsylvania. Current research interests include: Writing Across the Curriculum/Writing in the Disciplines; the interstices between contemporary poetics and Composition & Rhetoric; feminism and the epic poem; and intergenerational Holocaust Studies.

Madhu Kaza

Madhu Kaza
Born in Andhra Pradesh, India, Madhu H. Kaza is a writer, translator, artist and educator based in New York City. She recently edited Kitchen Table Translation, a volume that explores the connections between migration and translation and which features immigrant, diasporic and poc translators. She directs the Bard Microcollege at Brooklyn Public Library and teaches in the MFA program at Columbia University. She has been a Faculty Associate for the Institute for Writing and Thinking at Bard College since 2006. For more information download this file: kaza.jpg

James Keller

James Keller
Jim Keller serves as the director of the Bard College Learning Commons, which includes Bard’s writing center and writing program. He is visiting associate professor of Writing at Bard and has taught courses in Composition, Rhetorical Theory, Philosophy, American Studies, and American Literature at the State University of New York (Stony Brook and Sullivan), The University of Iowa, University of Montana, Michigan State University, and Bard College. At MSU, Jim led courses on popular culture, graphic novels, radicalism in literature, and experimental writing. And at Bard he trains writing tutors in his courses on Composition Theory and Pedagogy. He is a faculty associate for the Bard Institute for Writing and Thinking and has co-edited, with Alfie Guy and Erica Kaufman, <em>Writing from the Inside Out</em>, a journal showcasing the writing by participants in Institute workshops. Jim has taught in Bard’s Language and Thinking program since 2000. After earning his B.A. in Literature at the University of California, Berkeley, he received his Ph.D. in English from SUNY Stony Brook in 2001. Palgrave/MacMillan published his book,<em> Writing Plural Worlds in 2009</em> – a study of philosophical pluralism and multiethnic poetries – and his writing has appeared in collections on twentieth century poetry and poetics.

Mary Krembs

Mary Krembs
Mary Krembs has a B.A. from Marist College and an M.S. and a D.Phil. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her research interests include computational geometry (Voroni nets), computer graphics, software development methodology, human-computer interaction, and mathematical methods to compose and represent music. She taught as adjunct professor of mathematics at Marist College and as a technical project manager at Wellington Technology. She holds patent on a method to detect the closest existing point on a spline or polyline. She has been at Bard since 2007.

Abby Laber

Abby Laber
Abby Laber has been teaching high school and college English for over 30 years. For the past ten, she has worked at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she has developed courses on memoir, close reading and the academic essay, and also runs a seminar for new teachers. Abby received her A.B. from Harvard University. Through NEH and with the Calderwood Writer’s Initiative, Abby studied composition theory and memoir; she has been taking part in IWT workshops since the Institute began. Abby has presented her approach to close reading—the "Overview and Inventory"—at NEATE and NYSEC, and is working on a textbook about O&I and the exploratory essay.  Recently, she has been studying teaching through performance at Shakespeare's Globe.

Mare Leonard

Mare Leonard
Mary Leonard taught at Kingston High School for thirty years where she co-wrote a senior elective, In A Different Voice, which concentrated on American history, politics and literature and was the final course in the Law Program. While at Kingston she was a recipient of three NEH awards to study poetry and a Fulbright to study education in Brazil. After her retirement she taught at UCCC and Trinity College and wrote on assignment for a local newspaper. 

Her first love has always been poetry and fiction and she has published in numerous print and on line journals. Two most recent poems can be read in The Blue Collar Journal and in the collection of poems re Vietnam from Perfume River. She has been an associate of the Language and Thinking program since 1990, teaching workshops on campus and providing professional development for schools in the Hudson Valley. She presently works for Bard's MAT program. 

Karen Lepri

Karen Lepri
Karen Lepri's (B.A., Harvard University; M.Ed., University of Massachusetts; M.F.A. in Literary Arts/Poetry, Brown University) poetry, essays, and translations from Spanish have appeared in various national and international journals including 1913, 6x6, Aufgabe, Boston Review, BOMB, Chicago Review, Conjunctions, Lana Turner, and Mandorla. She is the author of Incidents of Scattering (Noemi Press, 2013) and Fig. I (Horse Less Press, 2012) Her writing interests include documentary poetics, butchness, and shipwrecks. She has been the recipient of the Noemi Poetry Contest and the American Academy of Poets, Weston, Kim Ann Artark Memorial, and Francis Mason Harris prizes for poetry. She lives in New York City where she is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches writing at Queens College.

Alice Lesnick

Alice Lesnick
Alice Lesnick, an IWT Senior Faculty Associate, is Term Professor of Education, Director in the Bryn Mawr/Haverford Education Program, and Convener for International Programs at Bryn Mawr College. A literacy researcher with particular interests in community-based learning and distributed knowledge, Alice has been with the Institute for 23 years. Currently, she is leading leading a teacher research group as part of an embedded professional development program in a Philadelphia charter school in partnership with the Institute. A former preschool, elementary, middle, and high school teacher, Alice is the recipient of the Rosalyn R. Schwartz Teaching Award at Bryn Mawr College. Since 2013, Alice has led the Lagim Tehi Tuma/Thinking Together Program, in which American and Ghanaian university students join with community mentors each summer for action research, reflection, study, and language learning in collaboration with four education projects: an early education NGO, a community radio station, a cultural dance and music group, and a technology training center in Northern Ghana.

Matt Longabucco

Matt Longabucco
Matt Longabucco (B.A., Binghamton University; Ph.D., New York University) is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Liberal Studies Program at New York University, where he teaches first-year writing, aesthetic and political theory, and a thesis seminar for seniors concentrating in Creative Critical Production. His interests include modern and contemporary literature with an emphasis on poetry and poetics, theory, film, and composition. He is the author of several chapbooks, and his poems, essays, and critical work appear widely. He has been an associate of the Institute for Writing & Thinking since 2001, and taught for many years in the Language & Thinking Program. He lives in New York City.

Sharon Marshall

Sharon Marshall
Sharon Marshall writes fiction and has taught composition, creative writing, reading and ESL at City College of the City University of New York, Hostos Community College, Essex County College, the College of New Rochelle, and the Fashion Institute of Technology. She has also studied writing at the New School, New York University, and Columbia University. Her fiction has appeared in Essence Magazine. She received a W. K. Rose Fellowship and the Jane Spector Award for Creative Writing. Faculty member, Bard Language and Thinking Program. (B.A., Vassar College; M.A., City College. Assistant Professor in the Institute for Core Studies at St. John's University, NY.)

Tracy McCabe

Tracy McCabe
Tracy McCabe is the Director of Writing Programs at Lake Forest College, where she also teaches English and Women’s Studies. Since 2000, she has directed the two-week summer Writing and Thinking Workshop for high school students, with Institute associates serving as the workshop leaders.

Andrew McCarron

Andrew McCarron
Andrew McCarron is a teacher and writer born and raised in the Hudson River Valley. He holds a Ph.D. in Social/Personality Psychology and chairs the Religion, Philosophy & Ethics Department at Trinity School in Manhattan. His books include: Mysterium, a poetry collection (Edgewise Press, 2011); Three New York Poets: Charles North, Tony Towle & Paul Violi, a collection of critical biographies (Station Hill, 2016); Light Come Shining: The Transformations of Bob Dylan, a study of the Nobel Laureate’s religious identities (Oxford University Press, 2017); and The Ballad of Sara and Thor: A Novella (Station Hill, 2017).  In addition to teaching and writing, Andrew also serves on the ethics committee at New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan.

Kristy McMorris

Kristy McMorris
Dr. Kristy McMorris is the Dean of Bard Academy at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Dr. McMorris holds a B.A. in English from Howard University as well as an M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from New York University. Dr. McMorris has taught at New York University and Hunter College. In 2009, she joined the faculty of Bard Early College, teaching at Bard High School Early College in Queens, New York. She was the founding director of the Bard Early College at Harlem Children’s Zone Promise Academy. Her areas of research include African-American and Caribbean Literature and postcolonial and feminist approaches to texts.

Delia Mellis

Delia Mellis
Delia Mellis is Director of College Writing and Academic Resources for the Bard Prison Initiative and the Site Director at Woodbourne Correctional Facility. She has been a member of the BPI faculty since 2008 and taught for four years in the Department of Urban Studies at Barnard College. Mellis has written and lectured on race and gender in U.S. history throughout her career. She holds a Ph.D. in United States History from the Graduate Center of City University of New York and a B.A. from Bard College.

Carley Moore

Carley Moore
Carley Moore holds a B.A. in Comparative Literature from Binghamton University, a M.A. in English Literature and Poetry from New York University, and a Ph.D. in English Education from New York University. She is a Master Teacher of Writing in the Liberal Studies Program at New York University and an Associate at the Institute for Writing and Thinking at Bard College. Her dissertation, entitled Seventeen Magazine and the Girl Writer, examines the relationship between popular American culture, American political movements in the last forty years, and how teenage girls have responded to these cultural and political changes in writing for *Seventeen* magazine. Carley’s poetry, essays, and articles have appeared in *The American Poetry Review*, *Brainchild*, *The Brooklyn Rail*, *Coconut*, *Fence*, and *The Journal of Popular Culture*. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux published her debut young adult novel, *The Stalker Chronicles* in 2012. Her current project, a novel, *Live at Roseland*, is about small towns and indie music.

Michael Murray

Michael Murray
Michael Murray is faculty at Bard High School Early College in Newark, NJ, where he teaches literature, as well as academic and creative writing. He has taught at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and in Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching program. He is a certificated language arts teacher, as well as a folklorist who has studied traditional culture in the American suburb, vernacular art and artists, and public history. His curatorial work in cultural studies and oral history have been presented at the Hudson River Museum (Yonkers, New York) and the Smithsonian Institution's Festival of American Folklife. MIchael holds a B.A. from George Mason University, an M.A. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Irene Papoulis

Irene Papoulis
Irene Papoulis is a Principal Lecturer in the Allan K. Smith Center for Writing and Rhetoric at Trinity College, Hartford. BA Binghamton University, MFA Columbia University, PhD Stony Brook University. She has published articles on the teaching of writing in various collections, including Into the Field: Sites of Composition Studies, The Theory and Practice of Grading Writing: Problems and Possibilities, Writing Ourselves into the Story: Unheard Voices in Composition Studies, and Writing With Elbow. With Michelle Tokarczyk, she co-edited a collection of essays called Teaching Composition/Teaching Literature: Crossing Great Divides, and she also appears as an occasional panelist on Connecticut's WNPR radio. She has been an associate of IWT since 1991. photo by Chion Wolf

Phil Pardi

Phil Pardi
B.A., Tufts University; M.F.A., Michener Center for Writers, University of Texas. Poet and translator. Author, Meditations on Rising and Falling (University of Wisconsin Press, 2008); has published poems and translations in Gettysburg Review, Best New Poets 2006, Exile Quarterly, Marlboro Review, Mid-American Review, New Orleans Review, Nimrod, Seneca Review, others. Editor, Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review (2003–05). Has worked as human rights activist in El Salvador and as labor organizer in the Hudson Valley; taught writing at Marist College; led poetry workshops at University of California–Los Angeles Writers’ Program. Recipient, Brittingham Poetry Prize; American Literary Translators Association Conference Fellowship; Adele Steiner Burleson Poetry Award. Codirector, Center for Faculty and Curricular Development (2012– ).

Cindy Parrish

Cindy Parrish
Cindy Parrish is an educator, film maker, graphic novelist, playwright, and professional storyteller. Co-founder of Heroic Productionz, an educational media production and consulting company, Dr. Parrish, until recently, taught humanities at the University at Albany's first year program, Project Renaissance. In 2012 she began teaching at Buxton School, in Williamstown, Massachusetts. She has been an IWT associate since 1995. She holds a B.S. in Communication Arts from Cornell University and a Doctor of Arts in English from the University at Albany.

Christopher Pérez

Christopher Pérez
Christopher Rey Pérez is a poet from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. His published works of poetry and fiction in English and Spanish include On the heels of our enemies, 427-375, regeneración, an untitled collaboration with Barbara Ess, El Siete Machos, REYNOSA, and Compendio palestino-puertorriqueño en proceso. His book, gauguin's notebook, received the 2015 Madeleine P. Plonsker Prize from Lake Forest College. Since 2012, he has edited a nomadic publication in, of, and around Latin America, called Dolce Stil Criollo. Christopher is a graduate of the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College and a former Visiting Lecturer at al-Quds Bard College for Arts & Sciences in Palestine. He has also taught in the Language and Thinking program of Bard College. Currently, he is the Program Director of the Bard Microcollege at Brooklyn Public Library.

Nancy Kline Piore

Nancy Kline Piore
Nancy Kline Piore publishes as Nancy Kline. Her short stories, essays, memoirs, flash nonfictions and translations have appeared widely, most recently in *Hawaii Pacific Review* and *The Prose Poem Project*. She contributes regularly to the *New York Times Sunday Book Review* and has received a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Grant. Her essay “Missing Paris” appears in *Best Women’s Travel Writing 2011*. She is about to publish her ninth book, a translation (with Mary Ann Caws) of Lorand Gaspar’s *Earth Absolute and Other Texts*. Earlier books include a novel (*The Faithful*), a critical study of René Char’s poetry (*Lightning*), and a biography of Elizabeth Blackwell (*A Doctor’s Triumph*). She has taught writing at UCLA, Harvard, and Barnard (where she was Founding Director of the Writing Program) and French language and literature at the University of Massachusetts-Boston and Wellesley. She is currently teaching 20th Century French Literature in Translation, under the aegis of the Bard Prison Initiative, at Taconic Correctional Facility, and is at work on a book of creative nonfiction entitled *Other Geographies*.

Kristin Prevallet

Kristin Prevallet
B.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; M.A., University of Buffalo. Poet, performer, and author of literary essays and cultural criticism. *Author, I, Afterlife: Essay in Mourning Time* (Essay Press, 2007) and *Everywhere Here and in Brooklyn* (Belladonna Collaborative, 2012). Co-editor, with Tonya Foster, of *Third Mind: Creative Writing Through Visual Art* and *A Helen Adam Reader* (National Poetry Foundation, 2007). Lives in Westchester and directs the Center for Mindbody Studies, with a private hypnotherapy practice in Manhattan. Faculty, Language and Thinking Program.

Andrea Quaid

Andrea Quaid
Andrea Quaid’s (B.A., M.F.A., Antioch University, Ph.D. University of California Santa Cruz) is a writer and educator. Her work focuses on  poetry and poetics, pedagogy, and feminist studies. She is co-editor of Acts + Encounters, a collection of works about experimental writing and community. Currently, she is editing a forthcoming publication on feminist poetics and pedagogy. She is also co-series founder and editor of Palgrave Studies in Contemporary Women’s Writing. Publications include albeit, American Book Review, BOMBlog, Feminist Spaces, Jacket2, Lana Turner, LIT and the Los Angeles Review of Books. She lives in Los Angeles and curates RAD! Residencies with Harold Abramowitz at the Poetic Research Bureau. She teaches in the Bard College Language & Thinking Program and in the Critical Studies Department at California Institute of the Arts. 

Joan Retallack

Joan Retallack
Joan Retallack is a poet and essayist: author of *The Poethical Wager* (Berkeley: UC Press, 2004); coeditor, with Juliana Spahr, *Poetry and Pedagogy* (Palgrave, 2006). She has published numerous other volumes – of poetry, and essays on modernist and contemporary poetics. Retallack is the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor Emerita of Humanities at Bard where she taught in Languages and Literature and was core faculty in Written Arts. An IWT Associate since 1984, she directed the Bard Language and Thinking Program for ten years, 2000 – 2009. New work is forthcoming from Litmus Press, fall 2017, and spring 2018.

Alexios Rosario-Moore

Alexios Rosario-Moore
Alexios Rosario-Moore: B.A., Eugene Lang College; M.F.A., The New School; Ph.D. candidate, Urban Education Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago. Alexios is a non-fiction writer, education researcher and policy analyst whose research focuses on segregation and stratification in schools. Recent academic articles include “One-App, Many Considerations: Black Social Capital and School Choice in New Orleans,” and “From the Ground Up: Criminal Law Education for Communities Most Affected by Mass Incarceration” published in The Clinical Law Review. His essays and short stories have been published in Post Road and H.O.W. Journal. Best American Essays 2011 named his essay “Field Studies: Roxbury, 1983” as one of fifty notable essays of the year. He is currently researching college choice in racially and economically isolated high schools and teaching in the College of Education at DePaul University. 
 

Neil Rigler

Neil Rigler
Neil Rigler has been teaching at the Lake Forest College Writing and Thinking Workshop for 19 summers. He teaches English, American Studies, Media Studies, and Creative Writing at Deerfield High School in Deerfield, IL.  He is a regular presenter at the NCTE and CASE (Council for American Studies Educators) conferences. He has been a faculty associate for the Institute for Writing and Thinking for twenty years, and has taught several weekend workshops.

Eléna Rivera

Eléna Rivera
Eléna Rivera was born in Mexico City and spent her childhood in Paris. She is the author of *On the Nature of Position and Tone* (Field Press, 2012), *The Perforated Map* (Shearsman Books, 2011), and *Remembrance of Things Plastic* (LRL-e Editions, 2010). She won the 2010 Robert Fagles prize for her translation of *The Rest of the Voyage* by Bernard Noël, which was published by Graywolf Press in 2011. Her essay “The Perforated Map, and Writing the Unknown” appeared in 2012 in *Transatlantica; Revue d&#039;études américaines/American Studies*. She is the recipient of a 2010 National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship and her chapbook, *Atmosphered*, is forthcoming from Oystercatcher Press in the U.K.. She teaches in the McGhee Division at New York University, as well as in the Stonecoast MFA program, and with Poets &amp; Writers in New York City.

Tyler T. Schmidt

Tyler T. Schmidt
Tyler T. Schmidt is an assistant professor of English and co-coordinator of the WAC program at Lehman College, CUNY. His recent book, *Desegregating Desire: Race and Sexuality in Cold War American Literature* (University Press of Mississippi, 2013) investigates cross-race writing, interracial sexuality, and queer identity in post-WWII American poetry and fiction from 1945-1955. Research interests include 20th-century African American literature, interracial cultural studies, critical pedagogy, and composition/rhetoric. His critical work has appeared in *African American Review*, *Women Studies Quarterly*, and *Radical Teacher*. Schmidt has worked as a teacher-consultant for the New York City Writing Project where he also coordinated a summer youth writers’ institute for NYC public school students. He also teaches courses on American literature for the Bard Prison Initiative. 

Brian Schwartz

Brian Schwartz
Brian Schwartz (B.A., Brandeis University; M.F.A., University of California, Irvine; Ph.D., New York University) has published fiction and non-fiction in Harvard Review, Ascent, Painted Bride Quarterly and elsewhere, and his story *Invasion* was recently selected for the anthology Inheriting the War. At U.C. Irvine he was awarded a Regents Fellowship and the Cheng Fellowship in Fiction, and his work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Areas of interest include creative non-fiction, the short story and the culture of American sports. He is a Senior Lecturer in the Expository Writing Program at New York University, and has also taught at Bard, U.C. Irvine, San Francisco State and at the Fir Acres Workshop at Lewis and Clark.

Patricia Sharpe

Patricia Sharpe
Patricia Sharpe fell in love with the Bard Institute for Writing and Thinking practices at a conference in 1983 where Institute Associates ran a workshop on Sylvia Plath’s poem *Poppies in October,* and she understood for the first time how for Plath blood could signify vitality. Since that year, she has taught Literature, Writing, Film, and Women’s Studies at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, where she became Academic Dean in 1993. She is co-author, with Frances E. Mascia-Lees, of the book *Taking a Stand in a Post-Feminist World: Toward and Engaged Cultural Criticism* (SUNY Press, 2000) and numerous articles. With Institute Associates Ray Peterson and Valeri Thomson, she has helped to found the Bard High School Early Colleges in New York City. A graduate of Barnard College, and of the Ph.D. program and the University of Texas, she taught at Lady Amritbai Daga College for Women in Nagpur, India, SUNY Buffalo, and The University of Michigan before joining the Bard family.

Gian Starr

Gian Starr
Gian Starr is the Assistant Principal at Stissing Mountain Jr./Sr. High School in Pine Plains, NY. Prior to this he was an English Language Arts Teacher in Secondary Education, working across grade levels in rural, urban, and suburban settings throughout New York’s Hudson Valley before earning tenure as a 7th grade ELA teacher in Pine Plains. Gian is a Fellow of the Bard Institute for Writing and Thinking, where he has led workshops for international students and has mentored a number of MAT teacher candidates. He has worked with the New York State Department of Education in developing their Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Framework and serves on a stakeholder panel for the redevelopment of assessment and teacher evaluation practices in New York State. He lives with his wife, son, cat, and turkey in New Paltz, NY.
 

Holly Swain Ewald

Holly Swain Ewald
Holly Swain Ewald, PhD, is a biologist and STEM teacher with research specialization in cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. She has been involved with the National Breast Cancer Coalition’s breast cancer vaccine project, works with oncologists and modelers to devise treatment protocols based on cancer evolution, and publishes papers at the interface of biology and health sciences. She has an adjunct appointment at the University of Louisville in Kentucky and has also taught at Simmons College, a small Historically Black College and University, and in the Bard Citizen Science program. She is particularly interested in questions of health inequity and the role of science education in helping individuals shape their own interests and impact policy.

Valeri Thomson

Valeri Thomson
Valeri Thomson (B.A., Mathematics, Bard College; M.A., Ed.M., M.Phil. and Ph.D., Columbia University) is the principal of Bard High School Early College Queens. She worked as a biology research director at Bard College in Annandale from 1997 - 2007, before moving to the Queens campus. During this time she developed a program for approaching scientific peer-reviewed literature using Institute practices. Working with the high-school faculty and students at the Rockefeller Summer research program and with faculty at different universities, she developed approaches that could be shared with students for taking apart research article and doing close reading of scientific texts to develop understanding even when the background of the reader was somewhat limited. In 2007, she founded the Bard College Master of Arts in Teaching Biology program. She is now a biology professor and principal of Bard High School Early College where workshop practices are utilized throughout the disciplines to help students develop their thinking through writing.

Valery Timofeev

Valery Timofeev
Valery Timofeev, PhD, is associate professor of Literature at the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences of Saint Petersburg State University. He teaches FYSem, Writing and Thinking, Language and Thinking and several courses in literature and culture. He has been leading teacher training workshops for faculties of Saint Petersburg State University, Perm State University, Southern Federal University, Astrakhan State University. He has published numerous articles on Russian and English literary history, narrative theory, literary semiotics, and a book John Fowles’ Classes (Uroki Faulza. 2003), has given numerous invited lectures at Daugavpils University in Latvia, Sorbonne in France, Middlesex University, Edinburgh University, UK.  
 

Alena Timofeeva

Alena Timofeeva
Alena Timofeeva, MA in English Language and Literature, is assistant professor of English at the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences of Saint Petersburg State University. She teaches English, Writing and Thinking, Language and Thinking. She has been leading teacher training workshops for faculties of Perm State University, Southern Federal University, Astrakhan State University. She has published numerous articles on EFL and EMI teaching.  
 

Robin Tremblay-McGaw

Robin Tremblay-McGaw
Robin Tremblay-McGaw is a writer and scholar who lives in San Francisco and teaches at Santa Clara University and in Bard’s Language & Thinking Program.  She is most recently the co-editor with Rob Halpern of From Our Hearts to Yours: New Narrative as Contemporary Practice (ON Contemporary Practice, 2017). Her book of poems, Dear Reader (Ithuriel's Spear), came out in August 2015. Her critical and creative work has appeared in Feminist Spaces 2.2. MELUSTripwireAufgabe, Little Red Leaves, Elderly, Santa Clara Review, On: Contemporary Practice, HOW2, Crayon, Mirage, Digital Artifact Magazine, POM2, Narrativity, Biting the Error: Writers Explore Narrative (Toronto: Coach House Books, 2004), and elsewhere. Her essay/poem “the queen’s english ain’t her own” is forthcoming in Queenzenglish edited by Kyoo Lee (Roof Books). For many years, Robin edited the poetry blog xpoetics.blogspot.com. For the last two years, with two of her SCU colleagues, Robin has been working on grant-funded projects on multimodal assignments. The team is currently building an SCU multimodal projects website which will be live in the fall and will include links to research, sample assignments, and student work.

Teresa Vilardi

Teresa Vilardi
Teresa Vilardi was assistant director of IWT from 1984 until 2001, and director from 2001 until 2012. She now serves as the liaison between IWT and Bard&#039;s MAT program, developing training workshops for both MAT faculty and IWT faculty. She earned her B.A. at Barnard College and M.A. in medieval and Renaissance history from Columbia University, and has studied in the Program in Psychology and Religion at Union Theological Seminary in New York City. She has taught history at the State University of New York in Binghamton; the College of Wooster in Ohio; Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York; history and women&#039;s studies at Broome County Community College in Binghamton; and taught in Bard’s Freshman Seminar Program. She was co-editor of *New Methods in College Writing Programs: Theories in Practice* (MLA, 1986); *Writing to Learn Mathematics and Science* (Teachers College Press, 1989); and *Writing-Based Teaching: Essential Practices and Enduring Questions* (SUNY Press, 2009).

Nicole B. Wallack

Nicole B. Wallack
Nicole B. Wallack, PhD, is the Director of Columbia University’s Undergraduate Writing Program in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, where she has worked since 2003. At Columbia, she teaches seminars on writing pedagogy, American literature and film, Creative Nonfiction, and undergraduate writing courses. Nicole has been an Associate of the Institute for Writing and Thinking since 1998. Nicole’s scholarship focuses on the history and aesthetics of the American essay, rhetoric and composition, teacher education, educational history, standardized testing, and knowledge transfer. Her articles include “Revealing Our Values: Reading Student Texts with Colleagues in High School and College,” which appears in *Teaching with Student Texts* (Utah State University Press, 2010). In this essay, she reports from surveys of high school and college teachers who have participated in the IWT’s workshops about their expectations for students’ academic writing. Her book, *Crafting Presence in American Essays*, offers theoretical and pedagogical arguments for rethinking the role of essay writing in high school and college in the age of the Common Core State Standards and the Framework for Success in Post-Secondary Writing. Nicole is the Vice President of the Council of Writing Program Administrator’s Metro Affiliate group, and sits on the Committee for Contingent Labor in the Profession for the Modern Language Association.

William Webb

William Webb
William Webb is the Director of Maybeck High School in Berkeley, California. He is currently the West Coast Coordinator of the Institute for Writing and Thinking at Bard College.  During his 24 years in education he has worked as a school chaplain, a humanities teacher, a middle school and high school director and as the Director of Classroom Practice for Bard’s MAT program in Delano, California. In his work for IWT he has taught at Al Quds University in Palestine, St John’s College in Santa Fe, University of Texas in Houston, The Sacramento Public School District, and was co-creator and co-leader of an NEH-sponsored series on teaching sacred texts in the classroom.  He earned his BA from Sarah Lawrence College and his Master’s in Theology from Loyola Marymount College.  He has published essays in Field Notes, The NAIS Magazine, La Voz, and Anthem

Robert D. Whittemore

Robert D. Whittemore
Dr. Robert D. Whittemore, Professor of Anthropology at Western Connecticut State University, earned his Ph.D. at the University of California in Los Angeles. After serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer and teacher and educational director for a child development center in Massachusetts, he did ethnographic fieldwork among the Mandinka people of the Casamance region of the Republic of Senegal. He also worked in urban Los Angeles with the developmentally disabled. As an associate of the Institute for Writing &amp; Thinking at Bard College, Whittemore, in his classes at Western, explores the relationship between writing and thought, underscoring the importance of developing the kind of ethnographic sensibility essential to global citizenship. His wife, Elizabeth, who has collaborated with him on some of his research and writing, is a poet, playwright and novelist. Their eldest daughter, Miranda, is a novelist and their youngest, Vanessa Kai, is a filmmaker.

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A dynamic, multidisciplinary team of Faculty Associates from a wide range of institutions collaborates with IWT to design and facilitate workshops and develop new writing practices. Below is a list of our active faculty. For more information visit this site: http://writingandthinking.org/resources/accomplishments/

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